Unique, eclectic, and eccentric yet timelessly elegant describes each furnishing, light fixture, or object from Driade. Established in 1968 in Fossadello, Italy, by art director Enrico Astori, designer Antonia Astori, and Adele Acerbi, the "aesthetic lab" applies boundless creativity and design to each object. The reigning theory: eclecticism, a blend of cultures, curiosity and an element of surprise are the essence of our era. Also behind every piece is a team of boundary-pushing designers, architects, and artisans, including Philippe Starck, Tokujin Yoshioka, Oscar Tusquets, and Borek Sipek.

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BO STACKABLE CHAIR - GREY
TOY EASY CHAIR - WHITE
KISSI KISSI TABLE
PRICE:$660
 
MT1 ARM CHAIR
PRICE:$713
 
TOKYO POP ARM CHAIR - WHITE
TOKYO POP ARM CHAIR - BLACK
PIAFFE COCKTAIL TABLE
TOKYO POP SOFA - BLACK
PRICE:$1,150
 
TOKYO POP SOFA - WHITE
PRICE:$1,150
 
PLIE ARM CHAIR
PRICE:$1,180
 
OUT/IN EASY CHAIR
PRICE:$1,190
 
TOKYO POP CHAISE - BLACK
TOKYO POP CHAISE - WHITE
MT2 SOFA
PRICE:$1,231
 
NEMO CHAIR
PRICE:$1,410
 
NEMO CHAIR - RED
PRICE:$1,410
 
NEMO SWIVEL CHAIR - BLACK
NEMO SWIVEL CHAIR - WHITE
NEMO SWIVEL CHAIR - RED
To understand Driade, you should visit its headquarters in Fossadello, near Piacenza. Seeing it helps to understand what it might be an "aesthetic laboratory" (as Driade likes to define itself) in the early twenty-first century. In this sense, the headquarters is a perfect "aesthetic laboratory" for it expresses the idea of an overall image where everything contributes to create a work of art; a Wagnerian gesamtkunstwerk, where you can find pieces of architecture, furniture, objects, fabrics and carpets and where designers, photographers, graphic designers, web designers, and workers can meet together. There's something that reminds us of the Grand Duke Ernest Louis of Hesse who called, in 1899, the architect of the Viennese Secession Joseph Maria Olbrich to design the "Colony of artists", Mathildenhöhe, in Darmstadt: made of buildings by Olbrich himself and, among the others, by the young Peter Behrens. It was right Behrens to give the most acute definition of Darmstadt: "celebration of life and art."